Triton FAQs

FAQs

> Who is involved in the Bermuda Project?

Triton Renewable Energy Ltd. and Carnegie Wave Energy Ltd. have signed an MOU to explore the potential of  CETO™ technology in Bermuda. Carnegie provides the technology, Triton the project management and environmental expertise. Offshore engineering experts AMEC will assist with engineering.

> Is BELCO Ltd. involved?

In September 2008, BELCO Ltd. issued a “Solicitation of Interest For Renewable Energy Projects” inviting suitably qualified companies to submit Statements of Interest for the development of long-term renewable energy generation projects in Bermuda. Triton submitted an SOI in response and was selected by BELCO as a preferred vendor.

> What are the next steps?

Having deployed the wave buoy and gathered a year’s worth of data, we can now confirm that the wave regime is sufficient to undertake a full feasibility study to explore a tailor-made solution for Bermuda. In the immediate future the focus will be on the selection of the most appropriate site.

> Is the CETO technology ready to install?

The first fully-grid connected CETO™ installation was in Perth Western Australia in 2014, with 3 CETO 5 units installed. The project supplied electricity to HMAS Stirling, Australia’s largest naval base. The next generation CETO 6 unit has a targeted 1 MW capacity, with the first installation also planned for Perth. In 2014, Carnegie was awarded a wave energy berth at the purpose built Wave Hub facility in Hayle, Cornwall, UK. The existing subsea electrical cables and grid connection at this site will allow Carnegie to construct an up to 10MW CETO grid-connected project. Updates on these projects and on the development of the technology can be found at www.carnegiewave.com

> How will the CETO™ technology reduce Bermuda’s carbon footprint?

The CETO™ technology will produce zero-emissions electricity and water, thereby helping to reduce the island’s carbon footprint.

> Will the CETO™ technology increase Bermuda’s independence from overseas oil and fluctuating electricity prices?

99% of Bermuda’s energy is presently generated through the use of imported oil supplies. Only 1% is generated on the Island through the Tynes Bay Incinerator. By creating an alternative source of electricity from a renewable resource, the CETO technology will certainly help provide Bermuda with a more secure supply of energy independent of the current price fluctuations we now experience.

> What are the likely environmental impacts of the CETO™ wave technology?

A full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) will be required in order to determine all impacts for the Bermuda Project, but the CETO™ technology has been selected because it is considered environmentally friendly. Once operational, there are no visual impacts as it is fully submerged. Studies on the CETO™ test units in Australia indicate that there are no harmful noise or vibration impacts. The net outcome of a CETO™ facility will be greatly reduced carbon emissions. Construction and installation activities will be carefully managed in order to minimise the impact on the marine environment.

> Will Bermuda’s residents be able to see the CETO™ platform?

One of the reasons that Triton became interested in the CETO™ technology as a viable alternative energy option for Bermuda was the fact that the units are all submerged and invisible to Bermuda’s residents and visitors.

> How big will the wave platform be?

We anticipate the wave farm will cover an area of the seafloor approximately five football fields in size.

> Will boats have to avoid sailing over the CETO™ wave farm?

The top part of the CETO™ pumps, the buoyancy actuator, will be located just below the surface of the water. Many local boats can pass over this quite easily, but it is too shallow for some to clear safely so “area to be avoided” will need to be charted. It is not anticipated that this area will be much larger than five football fields.

> Where else in the world is the CETO™ wave technology being used?

CETO™ development continues at Carnegie’s headquarters in Perth, Western Australia, where the first fully-grid connected CETO™ 5 system was installed in 2014. The project supplied electricity to HMAS Stirling, Australia’s largest naval base. The next generation CETO 6 unit has a targeted 1 MW capacity, with the first installation also planned for Perth. Carnegie is also planning to construct an up to 10MW CETO grid-connected project at the purpose built Wave Hub facility in Hayle, Cornwall, UK. Updates on these projects and on the development of the technology can be found at www.carnegiewave.com